Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS) to Resus Anti-D Gamma Globulin Injection

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Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS)

RDS, or Respiratory Distress Syndrome, is a condition that most commonly occurs in premature newborns, babies with diabetic mothers and babies born by cesarean. This happens when a baby has difficulty breathing and can't take in enough air because his or her lungs aren't fully developed.

 

Retained Placenta

Failure of the placenta to be expelled on its own within about 30 minutes after birth. This can result in excessive bleeding, and the doctor may have to reach into the uterus to remove the placenta from the uterine wall, in which case the woman would be given an anesthetic for pain.

Rh Factor

Rh Factor is a protein found in the blood serum. If the woman has this substance, she is Rh-positive; if she does not have it, she is Rh-negative. An Rh-negative woman carrying an Rh-positive baby may produce antibodies against the baby. When a baby's blood type is incompatible with the mother's, the pregnancy needs to be carefully monitored, because the result can be mild or severe damage or death to the baby from Rh disease.

Rh Titre

Rh Titre is a test done by drawing blood from a vein in the arm to determine a woman's Rh status, usually early in pregnancy.

Rhesus Anti-D Gamma Globulin Injection

This injection, Rhesus Anti-D Gamma Globulin, is given to prevent a woman's immune system from making Rh antibodies. The substance in the injection causes the Rh-positive cells in the blood to be destroyed. With no Rh factor to fight, antibodies do not form and the baby is protected. The injection won't work, though, in rare cases in which the mother's body is already producing Rh antibodies. When this occurs, the baby needs to be carefully monitored.